Adding a ViewModel

In the ViewModel, we need to have some values that are used to bind to the controls on the UI. Now create a new folder called ViewModels and create a new class called FirstViewModel.cs which inherits from the MvxViewModel class. MvxViewModel is a base class to encapsulate some essential features of the ViewModel, such as the INotifyPropertyChanged interface and the lifecycle of the page.

INotifyPropertyChanged is the important interface when using data-binding, which can notify the clients that a property value has changed. You can get more details about this interface here: https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/dotnet/api/system.componentmodel.inotifypropertychanged?view=netframework-4.7.2 . If we implement this interface by ourselves, you might feel that it is a little bit tedious. With this base class - MvxViewModel, we can easily create the properties that supports data-binding. Also, it exposes necessary lifecycle events to allow us to inject the handler to the specific lifecycle events. I created a code snippet to simplify the property inputs. You can find it here: https://github.com/yanxiaodi/MvvmCrossDemo/blob/dev/MvvmCrossDemo/Resources/CodeSnippets/mvvmCross.snippet.

Download this file and import it into your Code Snippets Manager, or just place them in this folder: C:\Users\YourUserName\Documents\Visual Studio 2017\Code Snippets\Visual C#\My Code Snippets\MvvmCross.

Now you can input the shortcut mvxpropdp for the properties:

When I set the value to the property, it will call the SetProperty(ref _property, value) method that comes from MvxViewModel to simplify the implementation of the INotifyPropertyChanged interface.

And mvxcmd for the commands:

IMvxCommand is a build-in command interface to implement the ICommand interface, which can be binded to the UI controls to response the user behaviour, such as click event of the Button, or select event of the ListView. ICommond is mostly used in the MVVM applications to separate the tight coupling between the UI and the event handlers. Most of popular MVVM frameworks in .NET provide an implementation of ICommand, such as IMvxCommand in MvvmCross.

At last, the ViewModel looks like this:

using MvvmCross.Commands;
using MvvmCross.ViewModels;
using MvvmCrossDemo.Core.Services;
namespace MvvmCrossDemo.Core.ViewModels
{
public class FirstViewModel: MvxViewModel
{
private readonly IGreetingService _greetingService;
public FirstViewModel(IGreetingService greetingService)
{
_greetingService = greetingService;
}
#region UserName;
private string _userName;
public string UserName
{
get => _userName;
set => SetProperty(ref _userName, value);
}
#endregion
#region Greeting;
private string _greeting;
public string Greeting
{
get => _greeting;
set => SetProperty(ref _greeting, value);
}
#endregion
#region GetGreetingCommand;
private IMvxCommand _getGreetingCommand;
public IMvxCommand GetGreetingCommand
{
get
{
_getGreetingCommand = _getGreetingCommand ?? new MvxCommand(GetGreeting);
return _getGreetingCommand;
}
}
private void GetGreeting()
{
// Implement your logic here.
Greeting = _greetingService.GetGreetingText(UserName);
}
#endregion
}
}

There are a couple of properties in the ViewModel to accept the input from the user and show the greeting message. We also have a command to respond the click event of a button. In the constructor method, there is a param called greetingService. I will inject the implementation of the interface in the next section.